EU ZMK's Diary

Welcome to the EU blogoshphere!
This time last year, I made a substantive decision, which completely changed my professional career, my mindset and even more: on 14 April 2012 I've created my very first EU blog. What can motivate an EU professional to start blogging? What are the benefits/dangers of joining the EU blogoshpere? Do EU bloggers bring an added value to the European decision making? The short story of the first year my EU blog may partially answer these questions.

How did I land in Brussels in 2011?
After completing the successful (“Schuman-price winning”) Hungarian EU Presidency in 2011, I’ve made a difficult professional decision: I voluntarily resigned my position in the Ministry of Health of Hungary and I came to Brussels to follow my professional EU career here – although I could have been stayed in Budapest, as experienced and well-respected former EU-presidency team member.

How to make noise in Brussels: start a blog!
Put yourself into my position: having throghout understanding how the EU works in practice, having in-depth knowledge mainly in the environment, social security and public health EU policies, speaking English, French, German and Hungarian fluently, what could I have done? Time has come to share my knowledge in a constructive way with the general public: I started to share my own views about EU affairs by setting up my very first EU blog .

The firs three months of the “Blog of Zoltán Massay-Kosubek”

The first article published on 14 April 2012 simply contained my career in EN, FR, DE and HU. Quite a modest start. The following day, I summed up a short presentation about my professional pathway. Not bad. But only the third entry contained the first substantive nutshell analysis about National Minorities and the Long Term Future of the European Integration. In the following days, weeks and months I mainly covered issues I had some knowledge or I considered being important:

issues relevant for the future of the EU integration (Thoughts on the possible future accession of Iceland to the EU),

public Health EU policy developments (How Healthy is Our Way of Thinking about Healthcare Cost Cuts?),

updates relating to the minority rights (European Youth Capital – the Example of Cluj, the Treasure City, Kolozsvár, a Kincses Város, Klausenburg, die Schatzstadt),

environment developments, with special regards to dangerous chemicals (Thought Starter about the Role of the REACH Regulation(EC/1907/2006) as regards Chemicals and Dangerous Substances),

EU foreig policy subjects, including the Eastern partnership ( The Tymosenko Case and the European-Ukrainian Relations in the Light of the 2012 European Football Championship), and

social security policies (Social Security Systems and the Financial Crisis).

Finally, I decided to re-activate myself in the active policy-making: after attending the 6 June 2012 Annual conference of the public health NGO European Public Health Alliance (EPHA) (23. Restructuring Health Systems: How to Promote Health in time of Austerity), I decided to join EPHA and use my knowledge to strengthen the voice of the European civil society.

From “Blog of Zoltán-Massay Kosubek” to the “EU-Hemicycle”
The Cyprus presidency gave a new impetus to my blogging activity: on the 1st August it organised a meeting dedicated to EU Bloggers (34. The Cyprus Presidency meets the European Bloggers: 10 key-messages of the Brussels Bubble’s Blogoshpere). After making contacts with other, similar EU-minded bloggers, I’ve decided to join the ‘Blogactiv’ bloggers community, and I moved my blog under this new system.

In a transitional periode, my posts appeared both on my old and my new blog: the first “dual” blog was the 36. Unprecedented International Legal Mistake from an EU Member State: Hungary Delivered the Axe Murderer to Azerbaijan : c’est plus qu’un crime, c’est une faute – old and new version published on 2 September 2012.

After reaching the 50th entry (50. The true Legacy of the EU Nobel Peace Price: the EU Shall never Force Democracy), the blog has been completely became a single blogactiv blog. Later on, all earlier blog entries have been transferred technically to the new system, and by publishing the first analysis in 2 January 2013 (51. The 3 Hidden Messages of the 2014-2020 EU Budget), the blog has been re-named from “Blog of Zoltán Massay-Kosubek” to “EU Hemicycle: updates on EU news ★ personal opinions about EU affairs & the future of the European Integration”. The very last blog entry in the first year of this blog has been created recently on 6 April 2013 (63. Minority Rights, Solidarity and Inequalities: question marks on Croatia’s EU Membership).

The balance of the first year

Once I’ve heard an African proverb saying: “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to get further, go together”. The lesson I’ve learned that by blogging, one cannot only express his or her own opinion but also find like-minded other EU professionals with whom new ideas and projects can be developed.

That is why the EU hemicycle is not only a blog which provides the opportunity to make comments under each blog entry using the comment function, but also a Twitter news-source (@EU_Hemicycle), a facebook page with daily updates, it generates the online newspaper ‘The EU Hemicycle Daily’, and last but not least, it brings together an online community with fantastic and open-minded people from different countries within and outside the EU in the EU Hemicylce LinkedIn networking group.

The first year is over, the next has been started. “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to get further, go together”. Do you want to go on this journey with me?

I remain at your disposal.

the compressed URL of this blog-entry ► http://bit.ly/11c3bV8

Related earlier updates:

The power of me: 8 key messages from a European Blogger to the Blog Action Day (October 15, 2012)

The Cyprus Presidency meets the European Bloggers: 10 key-messages of the Brussels Bubble’s Blogoshpere

(cover photo © alamodestuff)

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